August 15, 2013
It was John Steinbeck, in “The Grapes of Wrath,” who most effectively turned the Depression into a myth — a clash of light and darkness in which the selfless poor do battle with the heartless rich. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch)

It was John Steinbeck, in “The Grapes of Wrath,” who most effectively turned the Depression into a myth — a clash of light and darkness in which the selfless poor do battle with the heartless rich. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch)

August 14, 2013
The first task of a writer aiming to bring poverty out of the shadows, then, is simply to remind prosperous Americans that the poor exist… No writer has ever committed himself more fully to this task than James Agee, in “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch)

The first task of a writer aiming to bring poverty out of the shadows, then, is simply to remind prosperous Americans that the poor exist… No writer has ever committed himself more fully to this task than James Agee, in “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.” (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch)

August 13, 2013
More than a work of reportage, “The American Jitters” is, as its title suggests, a document of a mood — the combination of terror and excitement that occurs when a nation hits bottom and revolutionary change seems inevitable. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch) 

More than a work of reportage, “The American Jitters” is, as its title suggests, a document of a mood — the combination of terror and excitement that occurs when a nation hits bottom and revolutionary change seems inevitable. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch

August 12, 2013
No novel does more to crystallize that dark view of pre-crash America than John Dos Passos’s “The Big Money,” published in 1936, the seventh year of the Depression. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch) 

No novel does more to crystallize that dark view of pre-crash America than John Dos Passos’s “The Big Money,” published in 1936, the seventh year of the Depression. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Adam Kirsch

April 12, 2013
North Koreans should not be subjected to syrupy propaganda and anti-communist harangues. They should be exposed to the modern world, with all its complexity and uncertainty. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

North Koreans should not be subjected to syrupy propaganda and anti-communist harangues. They should be exposed to the modern world, with all its complexity and uncertainty. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

April 11, 2013
From time to time, newspapers shower readers with predictions of a looming mass starvation in North Korea, usually in springtime. The predictions come every year, but famine does not. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

From time to time, newspapers shower readers with predictions of a looming mass starvation in North Korea, usually in springtime. The predictions come every year, but famine does not. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

April 10, 2013
To an outside observer, the behavior of the North Korean leadership often appears short- sighted and irrational. There seems to be a tested and easy way out of their predicament — the path of Chinese-style economic reforms. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

To an outside observer, the behavior of the North Korean leadership often appears short- sighted and irrational. There seems to be a tested and easy way out of their predicament — the path of Chinese-style economic reforms. (Illustration by Michael Willis | OPED by Andrei Lankov)

December 25, 2012
Human beings dislike losses. In fact, they dislike losses a lot more than they like equivalent gains. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Column by Cass R. Sunstein)

Human beings dislike losses. In fact, they dislike losses a lot more than they like equivalent gains. (Illustration by Michael WillisColumn by Cass R. Sunstein)

November 12, 2012
What does it say about the 2012 election that Americans voted for a status-quo Congress? Maybe it means that with nothing accomplished there was no one to blame. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Column by Caroline Baum on Bloomberg View)

What does it say about the 2012 election that Americans voted for a status-quo Congress? Maybe it means that with nothing accomplished there was no one to blame. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Column by Caroline Baum on Bloomberg View)

May 21, 2012
Part 5: Manolo Blahnik gets into the shoe business and the sneaker challenges the corporate power pump. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

Part 5: Manolo Blahnik gets into the shoe business and the sneaker challenges the corporate power pump. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

May 17, 2012
Part 4: Smart girls wear flats. ” (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)
May 17, 2012
Part 3: The stiletto’s defining characteristic is not so much the height, but the girth, of its heel. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

Part 3: The stiletto’s defining characteristic is not so much the height, but the girth, of its heel. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

May 15, 2012
Part 2: “The 1940s femme fatale was the ultimate wolf in sheep’s clothing. Her shoes, peeking out, were her freshly polished fangs.” (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

Part 2: “The 1940s femme fatale was the ultimate wolf in sheep’s clothing. Her shoes, peeking out, were her freshly polished fangs.” (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

May 14, 2012
Part 1: Salvatore Ferragamo adds arch support to shoes and invents the wedge. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

Part 1: Salvatore Ferragamo adds arch support to shoes and invents the wedge. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Op-Ed by Rachelle Bergstein on Bloomberg View)

March 01, 2012
The finance dorks of Occupy Wall Street write a new Volcker Rule script. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Column by Susan Antilla on Bloomberg View)

The finance dorks of Occupy Wall Street write a new Volcker Rule script. (Illustration by Michael Willis | Column by Susan Antilla on Bloomberg View)